About Me

GuitaristI left the tropical and culinary paradise of O’ahu, in pursuit of higher education.  Lo and behold, this chase would lead me to the middle of tornado alley, where I am currently working towards a Ph.D. in Geophysics. I frequent racquetball courts, coffee shops, and social networking sites. On the rare occasion that I have some time to myself, I like to play the guitar. Otherwise, I am pretty busy traveling to field sites, coding scripts and programs, or processing and modeling data.

Warning: Be wary when approaching me with nifty gadgets, as I may start asking questions.

Education

In May of 2001, I graduated with an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts from Leeward Community College (LCC), in Pearl City, Hawaii. While attending LCC, I took an introductory geology class taught by Professor Kakkala Mohanan. Dr. Mohanan influence led me to pursue a higher education in geology.

In August of 2005, I graduated with a  Bachelor of Science in Geology from Northern Arizona University (NAU), in Flagstaff, Arizona.  My childhood experience in the Philippines fueled my interest in earthquakes, and led to an independent research project, which was eventually submitted as a señor thesis, entitled ‘Analysis of historic seismicity in the Transition Zone and southern Basin and Range of southeastern Arizona‘, under the supervision of Professor David Brumbaugh.

In May of 2008, I graduated with a Master of Science in Geology, The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP). My research at UTEP, was focused on active-source seismology, which was used to image subsurface structures. A thesis was submitted, entitled ‘Seismic evidence and tectonic significance of an intracrustal reflector beneath the inner California Continental Borderland and Peninsular Ranges‘, under the guidance of Professor Kate Miller.

I am currently working towards a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Geophysics, at The University of Oklahoma (OU). My research includes crustal structures, seismogenic processes, and earthquake hazards. My studies comprise field-based operations, lab observations, and computer modeling. Co-advisors for the research are Professors Randy Keller and Ze’ev Reches.

Academic Interests

I am interested in employing multi-disciplinary approaches to solving tectonic problems, with emphasis on continental crust evolution and mantle dynamics. My previous graduate research focused on the tectonic evolution of the inner California Continental Borderland-Peninsular Ranges transition zone, during western Transverse Ranges rotation, using seismic refraction and regional gravity data. My undergraduate research defined the first earthquake focal mechanism for the southeastern Arizona Transition Zone and its current tectonic regime. Although my research has been in seismology, I am also interested in field geology, fracture and fault propagation, heavy-isotope geochemistry, computer programming, and geographic information systems (GIS).

Current Research

Tangshan, China:

Tangshan finds itself in history as having one of the deadliest earthquakes in history, with over 250 000 fatalities. We recently (21 January 2009) conducted a seismic survey, enveloping Tangshan and its surrounding areas. In this study, we aim at locating subsurface faults and define a three-dimensional velocity model, in order to better assess the potential seismic hazards of the region. This research is in collaboration with the National Earthquake Response Support Services (NERSS) in China.

RUBIX:

I am conducting a comparative study of the Rigid Uplifted Blocks In eXtension (RUBIX) phenomenon. The study focuses on three tectonically rigid blocks: the Colorado Plateau in North America, the Tanzania craton in Africa, and the Ordos Basin in eastern Asia. Much of the study is still in development, but it will include analyses of geologic, seismic, gravity, and geochemical data.

ROGA:

We have recently developed the first laboratory setting in which loading parameters can be controlled, and measurements be taken on rocks that are rotationally slid along each other through a ROtational Gouge Apparatus (ROGA). ROGA simulates conditions that are similar to earthquake conditions. In this research, we hope to delineate the key parameters that generate earthquakes, from minor tremors to disastrous events.

Abstracts & Publications

Chang, J.C., Keranen, K.M., Keller, G., Qu, G., and Harder, S.H., 2010, Three-Dimensional Seismic Tomography Beneath Tangshan, China: Abstract T21A-2136 presented at 2010 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, Calif., 13-17 Dec.

Reches, Z., Chang, J.C., Boneh, Y., and Lockner, D.A., 2010, Fault Wear During Earthquake-Like Slip-Events in Laboratory Experiments: Abstract T31D-05 presented at 2010 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, Calif., 13-17 Dec.

Boneh, Y., Chang, J.C., Lockner, D.A., and Reches, Z., 2010, Fault-Wear Under Constant Slip-Velocity: Experimental Observations: Abstract T41B-2117 presented at 2010 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, Calif., 13-17 Dec.

Crain, K., Holloway, S., Chang, J.C., Závada, P., Dědeček, P., and Keller, G., 2010, A 3D Gravity Investigation of Devils Tower, Wyoming, USA: Abstract NS23A-1440 presented at 2010 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, Calif., 13-17 Dec.

Xu, X., Keranen, K.M., Asencio, E., Chang, J.C., and Keller, G., 2010, Variation in dip of the Caribbean Plate along the Muertos Trough: Abstract U13A-0017 presented at 2010 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, Calif., 13-17 Dec.

Li, W., Gao, R., Keller, G.R., Hou, H., Li, Q., Cox, C.M., Chang, J.C., Zhang, J., and Guan, Y., 2010, Seismic Refraction & Wide-angle Reflection Experiment on the Northern Margin of North China Craton -Data Acquisition and Preliminary Processing Result: Abstract T23B-2249 presented at 2010 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, Calif., 13-17 Dec.

Hou, H., Gao, R., Li, Q., Li, W., Kuang, Z., Liu, J., Zhang, J., Guan, Y., Keller, G., Liu, M., Cox, C.M., Holloway, S., Chang, J.C., Kaip, G.M., and Zhang, S., 2010, SinoProbe-02: Deep Seismic Reflection Profile (480km) experiment in North China: Acquisition and the Preliminary Processing result: Abstract T11F-03 presented at 2010 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, Calif., 13-17 Dec.

Chang, J.C., Boneh, Y., Lockner, D.A., and Reches, Z., 2010, Fault Wear Experiments, Part II: Transient and Steady-State Stages Under Earthquake-Like Slip-Velocity History: Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, v. 42, no. 5. [abstract]

Boneh, Y., Chang, J.C., Lockner, D.A., and Reches, Z., 2010, Fault Wear Experiments, Part I: Transient and Steady-State Stages Under Constant Slip-Velocity: Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, v. 42, no. 5. [abstract]

Chang, J.C., Reches, Z., Lockner, D.A., and Totten, M.W., Jr., 2009, Earthquake-like Slip Events on a Laboratory Fault: Eos Transactions, American Geophysical Union, 90(52), Fall Meeting Supplement, Abstract T12B-07.

Závada, P., Dědeček, P., Holloway, S., and Chang, J.C., 2009, On the geological origin of Devils Tower, Wyoming – A new hypothesis constrained by field research, analogue and thermal modeling data, and gravimetric survey: Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, v. 41, no. 7, p. 444. [abstract]

Reches, Z., Lockner, D.A., Chang, J.C., Totten, M.W., Jr., 2009, Earthquake-like slip events on an analog laboratory fault: Southern California Earthquake Center Annual Meeting Proceedings and Abstracts, v. 19, p. 320.

Chang, J.C., and Keller, G.R., 2008, A comparative study of the Colorado Plateau, Tanzania Craton, and Ordos Basin: Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, v. 40, no. 6, p. 377. [abstract]

Chang, J.C., 2008, Seismic evidence and tectonic significance of an intracrustal reflector beneath the inner California Continental Borderland and Peninsular Ranges [M.S. Thesis]: El Paso, University of Texas, 96 p. [abstract]

Chang, J.C., and Miller, K.C., 2007, Regional significance of lower-crustal reflectivity in the California Continental Borderland: Eos Transactions, American Geophysical Union, 88(52), Fall Meeting Supplement, Abstract S33A-1038. [abstract]

Chang, J.C., and Brumbaugh, D.S., 2005, Analysis of historic seismicity in the Transition Zone of southern Arizona: Eos Transactions, American Geophysical Union, 86(25), Fall Meeting Supplement, Abstract S23B-0235. [abstract]

Chang, J.C., 2005, Analysis of historic seismicity in the Transition Zone and southern Basin and Range of southeastern Arizona [B.S. Thesis]: Flagstaff, Northern Arizona University, 48 p. [abstract]

Professional Appointments

Professional Affiliations

Awards

Contact Info

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